Buildings and Architecture

Worthington Neighborhoods

 National Register of Historic Places

Worthington has 29 individual sites and 2 Historic Districts - Old Worthington and Rush Creek - listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

These are listed on the Ohio Historic Preservation Office website at www.ohpo.org

http://www.ohiohistory.org/ohio-historic-preservation-office/national-register-of-historic-places/national-register-search

Click on National Register of Historic Places>Searchable database>Search in Franklin County, City of Worthington (you need not fill any other boxes). This brings up a list of the 31 sites and you may click on any one for further information. Instructions at the bottom of the page indicate how you may order a PDF record for any site for $2 each.

Worthington National Register Sites

Rush Creek Village

Worthington Cemeteries

Worthington Landmarks: Photo-essays of Historic Worthington Properties

  This 1992 book by Robert & Jennie McCormick is for sale in the society gift shop and available in Worthington, Columbus, Ohio Historical Society and our own library. It is a collection of 37 essays with accompanying photographs of properties listed below ranging from the prehistoric Hopewell Mound on Plesenton Dr. to Toll Gate Square, the first condominium plat filed in Franklin County in 1964.

 Hopewell Indian Mound (Plesenton Dr.)

 Worthington Public Square - "Village Green"

 Kilbourn Commercial Building (679-681 High St.)

 Buttles-Johnson House (956 High St.)

 Worthington Manufacturing Company Boarding House (25 Fox Lane)

 Snow House (41 W. New England)

 Adams-Bishop-Heath House (721 High St.)

 Buttles-Pinney-Brown House (12 E. Stafford Ave.)

 Ripley House (623 High St.)

 Masonic Museum (634 High St.)

 *Principal's Cottage, Worthington Female Seminary

 St. John's Episcopal Church and Cemetery (700 High St.)

 Lewis House (36 W. South St.)

 Worthington Inn (549 High St.)

 Turk-Gilkey House (108 W. New England Ave.)

 Case Farm House (1937 Snouffer Rd.)

 Mattoon-Woodrow House (72 E. North St.)

 Scanlon-Skeele House (700 Hartford St.)

 Old Episcopal Rectory (50 W. New England Ave.)

 Gardner House (8221 Flint Rd.)

 Worthington Town Hall-Sharon Township Hall (67 E. Granville Rd.)

 Wright House-Sharon Memorial Hall (137 E. Granville Rd.)

 Gilbert-Wilcox House (196 E. Granville Rd.)

 Hart-Fay-Robinson House (64 W. Granville Rd.)

 Topping-Evans House (92 E. Granville Rd.)

 *Twin Oaks

 Wilson School (7447 Olentangy River Rd.)

 Holt House (675 Oxford St.)

 Griswold-Cooper House (160 E. Granville Rd.)

 Russell House (5807 N. High St.)

 Harding Hospital (445 E. Granville Rd.)

 Pontifical College Josephinum (7625 N. High St.)

 Deshler Library- School Administration Building (752 High St.)

 Kilbourne School (50 E. Granville Rd.)

 Scioto Company Settler Mural,Worthington Post Office (597 High St.)

 Wakefield House, Rush Creek Village (210 E. South St.)

 Toll Gate Square (970 High St.)

  *All were standing in 1992, but these two have since been demolished

 

 Styles and Structures of Old Worthington

  This 1997 photographic survey by the Worthington Historical Society resulted in four notebooks picturing all buildings in the four quadrants of Worthington between Morning and Evening, North and South Streets. It was a preliminary survey leading to the nomination of the Old Worthington Historic District to the National Register in 2010 when material was updated. It is available at the Worthington Historical Society Library and in the Worthington Room of the Old Worthington Library.

 

 Histories of Structures of Worthington and Sharon Township

  This research notebook was prepared by Robert McCormick in 1992 for the use of the Worthington Architectural Review Board and Worthington City Council in considering requests for remodeling or demolishing old Worthington buildings. It describes 98 properties, attempting to identify and document all 19th century structures in the city of Worthington and the western half of Sharon Township which was part of the original Scioto Company purchase. Deed and tax records are cited to determine, if possible, date(s) of construction for original buildings and any additions. Copies for public use are available at the Worthington Historical Society Library and the Worthington Room of the Old Worthington Library.

 

 Worthington Vignettes

  This collection by Columbus Dispatch artist, Bill Arter, includes his sketches of twenty-seven Worthington area buildings drawn between 1964 and 1971, together with a narrative based on his conversations with the owner about the building's history. His sketches are wonderful but many of the narratives contain serious errors. It is available at the Worthington Historical Society, Worthington and Columbus libraries and includes the following:

 "Orange the Combmaker" (home at 956 High St.)

 *"Griswold Inn" (northeast quadrant of Village Green -- Huntington Bank site

 *"Crossroads Inn" (different view of Griswold Tavern)

 "Oldest and Largest" (Worthington Presbyterian Church)

 "A Century and a Third" (St. John's Episcopal Church)

 "1804 Kilbourne House" (Kilbourne Commercial Building, 679-681 High St.)

 "The Snow House" (41 W. New England Ave.)

 "Tally Ho Destination (Worthington Inn, 549 High St.)

 "New Joins the Old" (Masonic Lodge, 634 High St.)

 "Elegant Restoration (Gilbert-Wilcox House, 196 E. Granville Rd.)

 "Wilson-Posey House (Mattoon-Woodrow House, 72 E. North St.)

 "Heart of Town Barn" (behind St. Johns Church)

 "Odd Partnership" (Township Hall, 67 E. Granville Rd.)

 "Antique Reproduction" (1969 Railroad depot, 990 Proprietors Rd.)

 *"Where Kenyon Began" (Bishop Chase home, St. Michael's site)

 *"No Chases Here" (Chase Tavern, formerly 5807 N. High St.)

 *"The Compleat Man" (James Wright home, Wright Park, E. Granville Rd.)

 "The Gingerbread House" (Russell Home, 5807 N. High St.)

 "Once 'Fool's Paradise'" (log house at west end of South St. near river)

 "1812 Boarding House" (25 Fox Lane)

 *"Jewell Maker's Retreat" (Alspach home, Kenyon Brook)

 *"The President's House" (Female Seminary Principal's Cottage)

 "Minifarm" (Farmhouse now on northeast corner of Morning & South St.)

 "The New Josephinum (7625 N. High St.)

 "Timbrook" (5811 Olentangy River Rd.)

 *"Trading Post" (Olentangy River Rd.)

 "Underground Station" (8995 Olentangy River Rd.)

*demolished

 

Researching Your Home

 If you are interested in researching your own home, a good place to begin is on the website of the Franklin County Auditor www.franklincountyauditor.com>your property> This gives you the choice of searching by owner name, street address, or parcel ID (from your tax bill) as you prefer. This brings up a summary sheet with owner's name, tax valuation and annual property tax, and a legal description which includes the name of the subdivision.

 On the left side of the website you have a number of options. To investigate your house's history click "transfer history," which gives recent sales, owner names, sale price, etc. If it is older than this record click "view prior history" and it may go back to the original owner (if it was built after city water/sewer records).

 This column is fun to play with because you can learn all kinds of things. Click on "area sales activity" and you have a sketch showing your house and others in the neighborhood that have sold in the last two or three years. Click on one and you find the summary showing the price of its most recent sale.

  There is much to learn from the auditor's website!

  If you are interested in knowing more about the architectural style of your home, you can find many books at the library. One we like that describes many typical American styles across the years is A Field Guide to American Homes by Virginia & Lee McAlester.

 If you are interested in getting the plat of your subdivision, the Worthington City Engineer's Office has a searchable database at www.worthington.org > Departments > Engineering > Engineering Planning & Services > Record Plans > Record Plan Search > Street name > plats. Click HEREPlats are in tif format which you can save, copy, print, or email. The engineers' office uses them for water and sewer records so they are kept up to date. Very convenient!

 

 

 

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